Alpha and Omega

Poster for the movie "Alpha and Omega"

Alpha and Omega (2010)

PG 88 min - Family, Animation - 17 September 2010

Two mismatched wolves embark on a cross-country quest to get back home and restore peace in their pack after being relocated thousands of miles away by well-meaning park rangers. Quick-witted Humphrey (voice of Justin Long) likes to frolic with friends and play video games with squirrels; disciplined Kate (voice of Hayden Panettiere) likes to call the shots and hunt caribou. Normally, an omega wolf like Humphrey would never stand a chance with an alpha wolf like Kate, but when they're both transported halfway across the country they must work together to get back to their natural habitat. And it won't be easy either, because the one thing Humphrey and Kate can agree on is that they don't have anything in common. Perhaps by working together toward a common goal, however, the two contentious traveling companions will finally realize that even lone wolves can use a helping paw every once in a while.

Director:  Anthony Bell, Ben Gluck

Photos

No images were imported for this movie.

Storyline

Two mismatched wolves embark on a cross-country quest to get back home and restore peace in their pack after being relocated thousands of miles away by well-meaning park rangers. Quick-witted Humphrey (voice of Justin Long) likes to frolic with friends and play video games with squirrels; disciplined Kate (voice of Hayden Panettiere) likes to call the shots and hunt caribou. Normally, an omega wolf like Humphrey would never stand a chance with an alpha wolf like Kate, but when they're both transported halfway across the country they must work together to get back to their natural habitat. And it won't be easy either, because the one thing Humphrey and Kate can agree on is that they don't have anything in common. Perhaps by working together toward a common goal, however, the two contentious traveling companions will finally realize that even lone wolves can use a helping paw every once in a while.


Collections: Anthony Bell, Ben Gluck

Genres: Family, Animation

Details

Official Website: 
Country:   United States of America India
Language:  English
Release Date:  17 September 2010

Box Office

Technical Specs

Runtime:  1 h 28 min
by Ginger

Cute, cute, cute! This movie has the most original plot that I have seen in a long time. In this story, the two main characters are wolves. The story revolves around the rules of pack order and wolf social rules. What impressed me about the film is that they got it right, making it a highly educational film for children. At one point in my life, one of my interests was studying wolf social behavior, particularly pack order rules. The plot revolves around these formal rules that really do exist in wild packsäó_and your own pet dog for that matter.

The problem that the two wolves face is that they have been relocated by park rangers to an area where they are supposed to repopulate. In a natural pack, the omega will never have cubs with an alpha female. The alpha female is the highest member of the pack and the omega is the lowest. This is good for the omega wolf, Humphrey because mating with the alpha female raises his status. However, the alpha would never mate with the omega, as this movie suggests, even if he were the last wolf on earth. The Omega tends to be the clown of the pack, and the Alpha acts like royalty. They really brought out these personality traits accurately in the characters. I was so impressed.

Together, they must find a way to make it back to their home pack in Canada. The MPAA rated this movie as a PG for rude humor and violence. I really had to look up their reasons on this one, because I did not see the reason for this upgrade to a PG instead of a G. The reasons they cited were hunting scenes, and a scene where Humphrey and Kate were seen kissing (or hugging, you canäó»t tell which) behind a tree. They cited scary images and violence related to hunting. I would rate it no worse than any movie that Disney has produced. The show of affection that they cited, was simply that, a show of affection.

I disagree with the MPAA on this one. I think this is good for children of all ages. It teaches some wonderful information about wild wolf packs, conservation, and the need to preserve habitat. It is based on real re-location and repopulation programs that have been underway by the National Parks Service for many years. I think that it has good, positive social value and the educational element overrides any show of affection or the realities of life that are portrayed. I plan to see this one with my kids!

OW-OW-OUUUUUUUUUUUUUH!

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